turbinar

(redireccionado de turbines)

turbinar

1. v. tr. Quitar las impurezas del azúcar con una turbina.
2. TECNOLOGÍA Aprovechar el agua de un río, un mar o una prensa para mover una turbina acoplada a un alternador.

turbinar

 
tr. Purificar el azúcar, utilizando para ello una turbina.
Aprovechar el agua de un río, el mar, o una presa, para mover una turbina acoplada a un alternador.
Ejemplos ?
Un ejemplo es el dispositivo SeaGen de 1.2 MW, de la empresa Marine Current Turbines, en Strangford Lough en Irlanda del Norte, que es la mayor turbina mareomotriz en el mundo.
All ships are propelled by Rolls Royce TM3B Olympus and Rolls Royce RM1C Tyne gas turbines, arranged in a COGOG (Combined Gas or Gas) arrangement, driving through Synchronous Self-Shifting Clutches into a Double Reduction, Dual Tandem, Articulated, Locked-Train gear system and out through five blade Stone Manganese Controllable Pitch Propellers (CPP).
Lubrication is required for correct operation of mechanical systems pistons, pumps, cams, bearings, turbines, cutting tools etc where without lubrication the pressure between the surfaces in close proximity would generate enough heat for rapid surface damage which in a coarsened condition may literally weld the surfaces together, causing seizure.
However, Admiral Kuznetsov as completed was conventionally powered by eight gas-fired boilers and four steam turbines, each producing 50,000 hp (37 MW), driving four shafts with fixed-pitch propellers.
However, the first generation of dreadnoughts built in other nations used the slower triple-expansion steam engine which had been standard in pre-dreadnoughts. Turbines offered more power than reciprocating engines for the same volume of machinery.
Friedman, Battleship Design and Development, p.91 Breyer, Battleships and Battlecruisers of the World, p.46 This, along with guarantee on the new machinery from the inventor, Charles Parsons, persuaded the Royal Navy to use turbines in Dreadnought.
--!-- Dreadnoughts were propelled by two to four screw propellers. Dreadnought herself, and all British dreadnoughts, had screw shafts driven by steam turbines.
It is often said that turbines had the additional benefits of being cleaner and more reliable than reciprocating engines. However, by 1905, new designs of reciprocating engine were available which were cleaner and more reliable than previous models.
Turbines were not without disadvantages. At cruising speeds, much slower than maximum speed, turbines were markedly less fuel-efficient than reciprocating engines.
Battleships, p.69 it was not until Nevada (ordered 1911, launched 1914) that turbines were rehabilitated for U.S. dreadnoughts. The disadvantages of the turbine were eventually overcome.
However, they were also heavier, took up a greater vertical space, offered less power, and were considered unreliable. --!-- The first generation of dreadnoughts used coal to fire the boilers which fed steam to the turbines.
The U.S. continued to use reciprocating engines as an alternative to turbines until the, laid down in 1912. In part this reflected a cautious approach to battleship-building, and in part a preference for long endurance over high maximum speed.